in which we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

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Hmmmmmm. Is it really St. Patrick’s Day already?

What should we talk about?  Irish Soda Bread?  NOBODY will be writing about THAT.  Irish Stew? Ditto. Irish ham? Colcannon? Guinness? Whiskey? The Corned Beef that actual Irish people don’t eat?  Yawn.

I have been working on some whole grain/wheat projects and spent a couple of weeks learning about and baking some authentic Irish soda breads. So far, one big thing I have learned is that aside from brief curiosity, my taste-testing friends prefer their Americanized fiction of Irish traditions much more than the real, farmstead and/or poverty-born deal.

Which fact has annoyed some enough to create an entire Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread with a very entertaining website and Facebook page.

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Call me odd, but I love the rustic character of irish soda bread. With very few ingredients, the freshness of the wheat flour is critical.  A perfect trifecta of  substantial whole wheat, rich, homemade butter & summer fresh peach jam. Who needs raisins?

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The real beauty of Irish farmstead food is that yes, it is simple, but because the home-raised and/or foraged ingredients can be so pure, fresh, wholesome and full of flavor, everyday food carefully prepared can be sublime.

Of course we know that Ireland has had her struggles with shortage and famine.  Simple things we Americans take for granted, like raisins and sugar for your soda bread  would have been special luxuries for too many Irish.

The last couple years I wrote about some pretty serious Irish topics, but really, who are we kidding? St. Patrick’s Day in America is just an excuse to misbehave, have celebrations, skip school, get rowdy and drink beer. Green beer. Lots of it, right?

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You first; No you!  It’s A Pig-Jam!  everyone’s afraid to jump off the trailer after a move. No point in rushing them, pigs operate on their own time. One day later, they’re jumping on and off with gusto. 

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Around here, those best able to devote themselves to the proper celebration of St. Patrick’s Day are the pigs. I know, I’ve been delinquent about filling you in on all the recent porky details, it’s true.  Raucus? Bawdy? Chaotic? Enthusiastic? Lawless, Loutish, Wild, uproarious, Unruly, Disorderly, Calamitous, Boisterous, Unrestrained and Pure-Gleeful-Mayhem?

I could go on, but I’m pretty sure you know how to use a thesaurus without my help. Let’s just say there’s face stuffing, racing in circles until they fall down, snuffling, brawling, barking, chasing, stealing, biting, snuggling, and some general rooting, mayhem & destruction.  Then, revelry over, the pile of snoring pigs catches up on their beauty sleep.

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Do not disturb:  A snoring pile O’ pigs

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Next comes the big, greasy morning-after breakfast (remember those?) to be followed by another power nap. The best nap ever they tell me. The restorative power of that grand nap gives them the energy they need to get up and do it all over again.  Every. Single. Day. It’s rough being a pig around here, I don’t know how they do it.

‘Tis shameless they are.

foraging the farm: great balls of pork

burdock

Inspiration for Velcro? No kidding…

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There are few things I love more than looking at something reviled through a new lens and finding that it’s actually just misunderstood. And, the burdock I inherited from the previous farmer? Let’s just say that’s one thing I’ve been determined to beat understand.

Burdock, burrs, beggar’s button, wooly burr, cocklebur, and the inspiration for Velcro, everyone knows burdock though you might not recognize it by name.

It’s that annoying large broad-leafed plant with the prickly burrs that get stuck in your hair, your socks, your sleeves, the wooly coat of the dog, and matts up the pretty flaxen switches of the Ladies’ tails.

After reading my favorite The Seasons on Henry’s Farm, my opinion if not my experience of burdock has been turned completely inside-out. Maybe I’ve just not been looking at burdock through the proper lens.

Around here, burdock is one of the plants that sends most farmers sprinting for the nearest vat of Round-up. But, on Henry’s farm, they actually plant the stuff. You read that right. I had to wipe off my glasses and go back for a re-read, but it’s true.

And, while we post-Colonial Americans have no real custom of eating burdock, it appears our Indian predecessors were well familiar with its virtues. Burdock was dug in the fall during the Harvest and Hunter’s moons, then dried to provide sustenance during the long frozen winter months.

The Japanese too have long had an appreciation for the sweet, delicately flavored crunchy root cloaked in its plain dirty brown wrapper. Never knew it, but the massive root is nutritious, delicious and has significant medicinal benefits as well.

So, with subversive glee and high expectations, I set out to prove that burdock’s unsavory reputation has been a bad rap all along.

I decided to make the chicken broth with pork and kale recipe from Nigel Slater’s enviable book, Tender: A Cook and his Vegetable Patch. Which is really the story of my life, only much, much cooler. I cannot wait for the movie…

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You say you think chicken broth with pork and kale sounds boring? Nay, nay. Anything but. Modern, richly flavored yet fresh, light, herb-y and comforting at the same time. And substituting burdock leaves for the kale is bound to shake things up, right?

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Fresh herbs are lovely, but Oregano Indio from Rancho Gordo gets ‘er done…

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I hunted up the more delicate, small leaves from the first year plants and gathered up a hefty bunch. Then I harvested green onions from the garden, mint from the pasture, and foraged roasted poblano peppers and ground pork from my freezer.

I made Nigel’s recipe more or less exactly as it’s written, but used my burdock leaves instead of the kale or cabbage. Here’s the printable recipe.

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My pork is slow raised heritage breed so I’ve got a bit more fat. Best of both worlds, just refrigerate & skim the fat from the top before serving.

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I so wanted this tale to have a different ending.  I mean, I worked those burdock leaves – I wanted them to be miraculous. But, even after boiling the burdock in water with salt & some vinegar to reduce the bitterness they were still peculiar and unpleasant. Washing-your-mouth-with-soap kind of bitter.

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baby burdock leaves – rinsed, blanched in water laced with salt & vinegar. Yikes! that’s some bitter shizzle…

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I have read tales of other people enjoying the flavor of burdock leaves and describing the bitterness as pleasant?  I suppose they’re telling the truth, but let’s just say it’s not for me. Acquired taste is kind of an understatement…

Now –  burdock roots? I’m still holding out hope for the crunchy-tender deliciousness of burdock root.

The pork balls on the other hand are simple perfection and not to be dismissed. Our American food culture is short on uses for unadorned ground pork, but when you buy a half or whole pig, guess what you have? Unless you have it all made into sausage, which is a bit limiting, you’ve got plenty of plain ole ground pork.

If you haven’t bought your pork in bulk, a good, old-school butcher shop that doesn’t get its meat in processed boxes should be able to grind you some.  I hope your town has one of those. If so, do check in and let us know about it. I love hearing about those kinds of artisan treasures.

I highly recommend keeping a bit of ground pork in the freezer. Nothing riches up your chicken stock like a long simmer with a few of these tender meatballs.They’re useful, versatile and freeze well.

Since the burdock turned out to be a not-so-great-idea, next time I went for the Savoy cabbage. Much, much better.  Cabbage and pork fat have a special bond, and the flavor of the cabbage doesn’t overwhelm the herby, delicate flavor of the pork balls.

But my favorite combination?  Definitely the kale. Delicious.  Far from being another kale cliché, kale & pork balls were made for each other.

What’s the next big weedy crop? Lamb’s Quarter. They say it’s like spinach, only better.  You know them, don’t you? They say a lot. I sure hope they’re right next time.

What do you say?  Do you have a favorite foraged green or excellent use for simple ground pork?

We love foraging the farm. Check out some of our other misadventures:

Monsanto’s got it all wrong: got weeds? don’t spray ‘em, eat ‘em

in which we lament: don’t hate us because we’re (not) beautiful

in which we say: My Haw!

Real Food Pantry Tricks: a freezer full of ratatouille

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A satisfying winter diet filled with veggies can be a challenge….

Sometimes, I need something warm, filling and rich that’s not soup. Something comforting and velvety in texture that can help me resist my cravings for calorie laden dishes like macaroni & cheese and mashed potatoes.

Yesterday we talked about what a flexible ingredient ratatouille is.  Today I want to show you my favorite lighter recipe and how doubling up each time I make it is one of the ways I preserve summer veggies for winter.

I found my ratatouille salvation in Martha Rose Schulman’s great cookbook for beginners, Light Basics Cookbook. Sadly, this book is out of print – it’s packed with gems, tips and tricks – particularly to those new to the kitchen. But, used copies are still available and Martha keeps a helpful online archive of her recipes, so all is not lost.

Here’s Martha Rose’s recipe for her less caloric version of ratatouille.

Except for one thing. Martha’s online recipe leaves out one slightly fussy step that makes the book version of this recipe such a treasure. Sure, you can skip it and your ratatouille will still be good, but why stop at good when you can have fantastic?

It’s only slightly fussy and the difference is well worth the effort.

The trick is reduction.  Making use of the power of reduction is one of the little-mentioned secrets of Kitchen Greats. Simmering a sauce until the water evaporates concentrates the flavor and thickens the sauce without adding flour or thickeners. It takes just a little more time and attention, but can boost a recipe from good enough to amazing.

A  reduction intensifies the flavors of my rustic fruit pies. Pan seared meat served with sauce made from reducing the pan juices and an added liquid is rich and elegant. I don’t love floury gravy for my beef stew, brisket or short ribs either. Instead, why not remove the meat & veggies to the serving dish and reduce the sauce?

Of course, you could finish by adding a knob of good butter which only makes the whole thing more plate-lickingly good…

So, how does ratatouille benefit from a reduction? Simple. After cooking, place a colander over a  large bowl. and dump the ratatouille into the colander.  The juices will drain into the bowl.

Transfer the juices to a saucepan and return the ratatouille to the casserole.

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Heat the juices to a simmer. Try to keep your boil as gentle as possible – the harder the boil, the faster the reduction, but also the more the flavor is altered by temperature. A slower simmer preserves the flavor.  And, any seasonings will intensify after being reduced so adjust to taste after the reduction, particularly the salt.

Reduce by half over medium-high heat, add your knob of butter if you wish (I wish you will), then stir the reduced juices back into the ratatouille.

This is a dish that is even better made the day before.  For best results, cook and refrigerate overnight.  Next day, serve at either room temperature or warm.

On seasoning ratatouille:  I admit that one reason I didn’t love ratatouille at first is because it tends to be heavily herbed/seasoned. Call me crazy, but I really don’t care for that.  Late tomatoes, peppers, garlic and onion have more than enough flavor without and some fresh basil added just before serving is just right for me. So, if you feel the same way or just don’t have the thyme and/or oregano, don’t let that stop you. The flavor without is every bit as delicious.

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If you’re going to make one ratatouille, why not make two and save some for later?

When you’re done, take your leftovers, measure out the size you would be most likely to use at one time (if you aren’t sure, go smaller). Two cups per bag is my preferred amount.

I prepare quart freezer bags by labeling them,  rolling the tops down and standing them up on the table.

You may be wondering, so here it is: there is no way to know in advance exactly how many bags you will need, so label cautiously. You could label after filling, but it’s really hard to write on jiggly filled bags and messy & difficult for marker to adhere to frozen ones.

Carefully measure your rat into the bags, squeeze any air from the bag, seal and lay flat on its side on a baking sheet or flat plate.  Carefully stack your bags so each lays perfectly flat.  Place the stack of filled bags into the freezer, keeping as straight and level as possible.

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Freezing the bags flat on their sides on a plate or baking sheet is an important detail.  Skip it and the weight of the liquid will cause the contents to sink around the freezer racks.  The bags will become entwined around the racks, then freeze that way making it impossible for you to remove them from the freezer or stack them neatly.

Don’t ask me how I know this…

Next day, when your bags are frozen solid, you can stack them upright to save space. Plastic organizers and large freezer containers help keep everything tidy, visible and help you squeeze more in.

The more tightly packed your freezer, the more efficiently it runs. 

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Do this all summer and you’ll have a virtual library of preserved “books”.

What kinds of garden goodness is in my library? Pumpkin puree, fresh tomato sauce, squash, ratatouille, roasted beets, beet greens, cantaloupe puree, shredded zucchini, rendered lard and plum pie filling.

What’s in your freezer library? Any delectable secrets? Do share…

10 reasons you need a freezer full of ratatouille

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Last call all ye wannabe preservers.

Soon enough, we’ll be forced to choose one of our off-season options for our veggies. If you’ve been a busy preserver Ant, your winter veggies are already tucked away in jars, freezers or root cellars.

If not, you Grasshoppers can still get something put by if you hit it now. As in today.

And, if you think you would never eat vegetable stew on a regular basis, you need to work on your biggest kitchen tool of all; your brain. Not because you’re not smart, but because we’re usually too rushed to the take time to consider familiar things more deeply.  When we do, we often find there’s usually a lot more “there” there. At least it is with this vegetable stew.

The key to becoming a Jedi leftover-ninja is stocking your pantry with flexible basics.  Ratatouille is a chameleon of a staple that freezes up nicely and does lots of useful tricks:

  • Use ratatouille in omelets or frittatas
  • Pizza topping: puree to your favorite degree of chunk, add a pungent accent like capers, olives, anchovy, or hot sauce, top with grated cheese and yum.
  • Blend and use as a sauce for pasta, fish or meats – add cured black olives, nice!
  • Switch up your salad: serve room temperature ratatouille drizzled with vinaigrette over a bed of greens
  • Dip/sandwich spread – pulse in a food processor and add one or more pungent flavors like mustard, vinegar, capers or hot sauce.
  • Soup base: puree until completely smooth, then thin with your favorite stock. After that, throw in whatever else or absolutely nothing. Need I mention cream?
  • Quiche – mixed with egg, Gruyère, Parmesan and milk and baked into a crust. Mmmm, old school fast food…
  • Quesadilla – schmear Rat topped with shredded cheese between two tortillas & toast until crispy. What kid questions the Quesadilla?
  • Hand Pies/Empanadas – mix some with beans and cheese and tuck into a circle of dough. Bake or fry, or even better, tuck some uncooked into the freezer for a quickie later.
  • Quick, comforting, simple main dish: warm Rat served over cooked pasta, grain, polenta, gnocchi or noodles tossed with a little butter or oil. Top with a grated pungent cheese.

Don’t believe me? Even Thomas Keller says so.  Check out his post on the LA Times sharing some of the ways he uses ratatouille. He says:

“With a little imagination, a pot of ratatouille can be a door opening onto a whole world of dishes.”

See?  Tomorrow we’ll get busy with my favorite (lighter) ratatouille recipe and a system to make sure your freezer is filled with ooey, gooey, summer-vegetable goodness all winter.

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Today?  I just want you to think about how seriously this can make your winter better and figure out how you’re going to get your paws on the ingredients.

This is a call to action… I hope you’ll accept the challenge.

Already on board the Ratatouille train? I’m dying to know how you do Ratatouille – let us in on your ratty secrets by commenting below…

Zaymonster giveth and Zaymonster taketh away

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one sunny morning last week, see what I found?

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I’m feeling super-sorry for myself. It’s okay, I gave myself permission. I’m going to make a full evening of it, and maybe even eat a big bowl of ice cream in bed. You know, to make myself feel better.

Why’s that? You’ll have to ask Zay.  It’s all her fault.

She’s been waiting, waiting and waiting some more for her calf to be born. Zay’s a funny cow when it comes to babies.  Until hers is born, she lurks and trolls around the other mothers’ calves, even going so far as stealing and hiding one last year.

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Waiting, waiting & waiting some more…

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Then, once Zay has her own, she’s fine. She’s an excellent mother, but is very private about her top-secret parenting business.  Oddly,  this year, Zay’s baby was over a month later than the others.

Zay laid off the trolling and kidnapping this season, opting instead for being alone, moody and pensive. She spent lots of time laying her bulky self down and gazing off into the distance. She kept getting bigger and bigger, but that baby just didn’t want to come.

Finally, early one sunny morning, I found him in the tall grass, fed, bathed and curled up beside his mother for his first newborn nap.

Zay, like the good mother she is, nested in a private corner of the pasture with the little one for several days. Ever dutiful, she left him only briefly now and then for a quick drink of water.

Gradually, she rejoined the herd, but as cows sometimes do, Zay tucked the baby into a hidey-hole so she could visit with her friends and do her work alone.  Then, when she’s done, Zay goes back and spends the evening with her baby.

I was a tiny bit worried last night when I didn’t see the baby, but Zay was completely unconcerned. Zay and I have been through this together a few times now, and I know she’s on top of things. If there was a mishap, surely she would be fretting.

Wouldn’t she?

But Zay seemed to be a cow without a care in the world. Or a baby either.  If it wasn’t for her ginormous udder, I’d think she was a single girl.  The udder is an important clue: if Zay’s udder was empty, I’d know that even though I couldn’t see the calf, he had eaten. But this was one huge, ready-to-burst udder.

When was the last time the baby drank?  Come on Zay, I need some clues here!

But, as usual, Zay ignored me. She paid no attention as I walked up and down the pasture, crawled under fences and pawed the tall grass.  She was unconcerned when I got out the tractor and drove up and down. She enjoyed a leisurely drink and had dinner with her friends.

I was getting discouraged. Disheartened. Sad.  I was blaming myself for being too busy, and for trusting Zay’s mothering ability. I  looked for signs of struggle, circling vultures or other markers of doom.  But there were none of those either.

Parked inside the pasture on my tractor, I was starting to take it hard. And then, guess what happened next?

Suddenly and with purpose, Zay left the herd and walked off to the spot I had combed first on foot, then by tractor just an hour before. She called a few times, and up he popped! He was waiting, not for my noisy self, but for his mother’s call.

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Zay doesn’t get what all the fuss is about. She had important cow business – geez!

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Peppy & perky, he bounced up ready for a big supper.  I don’t think I have ever been so grateful to see anything, ever. Luckily this tale has a happy ending.  Not only did Zaymonster giveth, then taketh back, she gave him to us once again.  Whew!

Am I supposed to find some deep hidden lesson here?  

Don’t know, but I surely am grateful.  I’ll never doubt you again Zay.

Want more about Zay and her kidnapping ways?

hay there!

hay bales

stocking the pantry

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Hay is for horses, right? Horses, cows, sheep, goats, pigs and more types of livestock than I can think of in a quick minute. Yet, like bees, as crucial as it is to our food supply, most people don’t know much about hay nor do they care to.

Bor-ing

I mean, what does a bunch of tall grass, mowed, packed into bales and fed to livestock have to do with our high-tech busy lives anyway?

Food prices have been creeping up for a while now, mostly by prices staying the same while the boxes and bags quietly shrink. Do they think we don’t notice?

Here’s the  funny thing about farming cause and effect: the price impact at the grocery store is slow to follow a disastrous farming event so when prices go up, we don’t remember why.

Maybe we tuned out that farming story on the news – nothing to do with us, right?  Or, what worries me more, many farming events aren’t covered on major news outlets at all.  When they are, reports are at best brief, oversimplified and skewed towards Big Ag as if alternative methods did not even exist.

This void of information about such a crucial piece of infrastructure we cannot live without is frightening.  I know farming isn’t as fascinating as the Kardashians, but honestly, it is a pretty action-packed and intrigue-filled industry once you start doing a little reading. Here’s a good place to get started. It’s  one of my favorites packed with  beautiful and memorable photos and essays.

Fatal Harvest Image

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And all ye Pittsburghers, guess what? There’s a copy at the Carnegie Library. You are using our amazing public library system aren’t you?

Once again in Pennsylvania, it’s hay time. Of course things have been dry as a bone for weeks. But, now that it’s time to mow my hay, Murphy’s law is coming on strong. Rain, dark skies and spotty bad news on the weather channel.

Last year, the first time I ever remember such a thing, we had no second or third cutting of hay. That may not mean much to you, but many years, some farmers get as many as four cuts in a season. Around here, you can count on at least two cuttings with the second & third cuts being generally considered the best quality.

What’s a cut? It’s one harvest of mowing, raking and packing the hay into tight bales. If you’d like to know more, here’s a good post explaining some of the intricacies of making hay from Baum Farm in Vermont.

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My neighbor Mike mowing hay

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Last year, after being mowed once for first cut, the drought-stunted regrowth was so thin, mowing and bailing wasn’t worth the price of the gas needed to get the tractors and equipment out. Hayfields were producing a fraction of their usual generous number of second and third cut  bales. If you missed first cut, you were out of luck.  And guess what? We missed first cut.

Remember Business 101 when we learned about supply and demand? Supply goes down, demand goes up. When demand is high and supply low, prices go up. So it is with hay, corn and soy at the moment.

For this farm,  hay prices this past winter were at least five times higher than the winter before.  What that means to you is that animals who eat hay, corn and soy and use straw for bedding increased their cost of living by at least five times if not more. It’s only a matter of time before that fact begins to show up in the grocery store.

You probably didn’t pay too much attention to the drought talk on the news because rainy summer days spoil your fun and prices on items like pork, hamburger and chicken stayed stable or even went down this winter.

How can that be?

Mainly because farmers were busy dispersing their breeding stock – animals farmers normally would never part with – into a buyer’s market to stop the fiscal hemorrhage of having to purchase feed for the winter. You had plenty of hamburger because expensive-to-feed dairy cows were being “retired” way before their time.

Now, herd sizes are lean. There will not be as many cows, pigs and chickens. And prices for hay, straw, soy and corn are still higher than ever and farmers are scraping the bottoms of their coffers to hang in for another growing season.

A third challenging growing season in a row will have harsh consequences.

Back to basic supply and demand, groceries are bound to go up again. Milk, eggs, cheese and meat will be creeping up.  In the butcher shop where I work, our largest chicken supplier went out of business without warning. Chicken prices have suddenly jumped from $3.09/lb for boneless, skinless chicken breasts to $3.89/lb and chicken tenders cracking the four dollar mark. In one week.

Big difference.  What does this all have to do with my tiny farm?

Like many small farmers, I don’t have my own haymaking equipment, and rely on neighboring farmers to cut and bale my hay. Last year, my farmer didn’t get my first cutting mowed in time, and I just told you there was no second or third cut.

So, I had to purchase hay.  It was a real blow, let me tell you. And I am well aware that I was one of the lucky ones. Out west it was much, much worse.

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My hayfield: cut, soon to be raked & baled

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Not a total bust –  grass did rebound in the fall and the hayfield kept the cows fed well into the winter so I did not need to feed dry hay for as many months.

Since the thrifty Devon cattle eat nearly half the amount as some other breeds, I also didn’t have to purchase as much or find super-rich and super-expensive special quality hay, and the cows as usual stayed healthy, fit and satisfied on simple, ordinary first cut dry grass hay.

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the experts conduct a tasting: their verdict? Three hooves up

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So we survive to do it again this year. Today, the hayfield is tall and thick and ready for harvest.

And, as much as I appreciate a good spring rain, this week, our fingers and hooves are crossed for some nice, dry, sunny, breezy days.

What’s happening with food prices where you live?

Update: Hay’s in! Thank goodness because if you live in Pennsylvania, you know we’ve had rain nearly every day for over a week, and more to come. We made it by the skin of our horns, and yield is still a bit lower than usual, but the hay is beautiful. We will be buying a bit more, and/or making second cut, but the larder won’t  be bare. Whew!

M is for cream pie

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This post is brought to you by the letter M

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Don’t be mad letter C, I know I wouldn’t have cream, coconut or cantaloupe without you. But mMother’s birthday, Mother’s Day, Memorial Day all start with the letter M. And, they all happen in the second half of the Month of May.

Something special my mother really likes is coconut cream pie. So I make coconut cream pie for her birthday. See?

Anyway, I’m really appreciating the Food 52 site lately. And this recipe from em-i-lis for coconut cream pie was, though I didn’t know until I found it, something I’ve sorely needed.

Not too sweet, rich and creamy with a dense, real custard filling – no gelatin, tapioca or other textural trickery. Pure, true and perfectly coconut. Thanks em-i-lis & Food 52 for making my day.

Even better? There’s a two-fer in this recipe. A homemade version of sweetened coconut flakes that’s so much more delicious and healthy than store-bought sweetened coconut. If you never ever make the pie, do yourself a favor and make the toasted, sweetened coconut.

I had no idea how many things were in need of a sprinkle of toasted coconut…

Bob's Red Mill coconut flakes

This is not a paid ad, I swear…

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Thanks too, Bob’s Red Mill for these amazing unsweetened coconut flakes. I like a rustic, chunkier texture which I realize not everyone will prefer, but these larger flakes toasted are unique and special.  If you favor a more delicate, finer grind, Bob’s has that too.

I know. Coconut is not local to western Pennsylvania.

While I’ve dramatically cut down on my dependence on non-local products, I still live in a world where lemons, oranges, almonds, avocados, olives, bananas and coconut are everyday items and they are sometimes impossible for me to resist too. Nor, as long as they are produced in a fair and clean way, do I see any reason I should.

Moderation, man. Moderation.

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Cantaloupe from last summer’s garden, pureed and frozen

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So, inspired by my coconut cream pie success, and cleaning out the freezer to make space for this summer’s booty, how could an idea be any more perfect than this: cantaloupe cream pie?

Em-i-lis’ recipe can easily be adapted for any pureed fruit, as long as the thickness of the fruit puree is right.

Aiming to match the texture of the coconut milk called for in the recipe, I took four cups of cantaloupe puree from the freezer and reduced it to about 1 1/2 cups, which worked out perfectly.  It doesn’t have to be exact, just pudding-thick.

Then, I followed the recipe exactly, except for these changes:

  • I replaced the coconut milk in the custard recipe with my thickened fruit puree
  • I did not add fruit puree to the whipped cream. I did use the sugar
  • I did not add flaked coconut to the cantaloupe custard
  • I kept the toasted coconut garnish since I thought it went well with the cantaloupe, but may not suit all your fruit flavors. It does add a nice texture
  • I used my favorite butter crust recipe, though em-i-lis’ crust method is pretty intriguing. If you try it, do come back and let us know how you like it

Success! Now I have a flexible, mix & match cream pie method for the juicy fruit bonanza  coming soon.

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 no weepy, runny fillings or soggy crusts need apply

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Peaches, plums, berries, cherries, pumpkin, squash… hurry up and get here already!  How about you? What’s your favorite cream pie?