building a real foods pantry: everyday cornmeal cookies

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Closest I’ll get to sunshine this cold, gray early spring day

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Sugar  Corn Pops, Bugles, Niblets, Jiffy Cornbread Mix, Fritos, and summer’s long-awaited treat corn on the cob was my childhood understanding of corn.  Then Chi Chi’s changed everything when they showed up with the tortilla chips and salsa.   And, if I hadn’t married a man who loved polenta, that would have been the complete, quickie version of my entire corn history.

Somehow, without any informed, factual reason, corn just got pushed to the back of my brain and marked second-class; lesser somehow than other whole grain options.

Is it because Corn’s crackie relatives are always attracting controversy for their freakish DNA , their miscreant behavior and their Big Food/Big Ag shenanigans?

Not sure, but  my brain somehow decided corn = not so good and locked it away.

Well. Boy, do I ever owe Corn an apology. Turns out there’s a lot more to her than the few commercial varieties used by industry in about a gazillion-and-one products. Check out what the Whole Grains Council has to say about this useful, delicious and nutritious grain.

My deeper exploration of corn started with polenta. Then came  home made cornbread. And is there any more filling and satisfying breakfast than a steaming bowl of cornmeal grits with their delicious pool of melted butter or, even better, cheese?

I have yet to grind my own cornmeal, explore hominy or make my own tortillas, but that’s sure to happen eventually.  Particularly since planting my own corn is one of this summer’s projects, and I’m very excited about the open pollinated Early Riser variety waiting in its box for the soil to warm.

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But you know what is a truly underrated use for corn? Cakes and cookies. Ask the Italians-  they know. Corn makes some super-delicious (not too) sweet treats.  Recently one chilly gray day I made these Italian cornmeal cookies, masa zaletti.

In case you haven’t noticed, I am an unashamed lover of cookies.  There is no occasion that isn’t improved with a cookie, and if there’s a person who isn’t cheered by one, I sure haven’t met them.  Since I am so helpless to resist, I prefer to keep cookies around that are more rustic, wholesome, less processed and not so sweet as store-bought brands.

And, of course anytime I cook something entirely from ingredients raised here and/or bought from local farmers instead of the grocery store, it’s a real bonus to say the least.

This particular recipe from Whole Grains for a New Generation adds a more savory element by mixing the raw fine yellow cornmeal with the New World ingredient masa harina.  Check out the printable recipe here. 

The whole batch only calls for 1/3 cup sugar, and no white flour at all, so I’d say these were a truly guilt free way to make a little sunshine of your very own.

What’s your favorite way to enjoy corn?

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4 thoughts on “building a real foods pantry: everyday cornmeal cookies

  1. Mmmm. Those look great–I really like savory/sweet things too. Of course that’s not terribly descriptive, but treats like corn cookies are perfect–not too sweet, a smidgen hearty, and homemade. Yum.

    My favorite corn product besides fresh corn on the cob is grits. As a Southerner I ate them every morning for breakfast. Now that I live in Pa. I have to search a bit to find the non-instant kind.

    I started to read Michael Pollan’s “Omnivore’s Dilemma” over the holidays and it certainly makes corn seem like something you don’t want to touch. It’s an interesting read and I’ll leave out my opinions, except that it really made me a believer in homemade. I guess it just made me more of a believer in homemade, simple, moderation, and self sufficient.

    ~Trish

    1. I guess I’m lucky in that Bobs Red Mill is easy to find in many Pa grocery stores and were also lucky to have Frankferd Farms not too far away. Frankferd Farms is an awesome resource for whole grains & organics – see if they deliver near you…

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